Category Archives: hardware

We have vision!

I bought a Raspberry Pi camera to go with the RPi 3 for the school project. The eventual intention is to put it on our tank robot so we can see what it is seeing.

Following on from the previous tutorial IoT: Raspberry Pi Robot with Video Streamer and Pan/Tilt camera remote control over internet I installed streaming software, plugged in the camera and crossed my fingers. Loading the page showed some promise except I’d turned the lights off in the server room when I went away, so I had a square of black. Back to the server room, then back to my computer to find I was looking at the roof of the server room.

It works!

First view from the pi camera. The server room ceiling, not the most exciting view.
First view from the pi camera. The server room ceiling, not the most exciting view.

Science Talent Search – Robot Buggy

My son entered Science Talent Search with this Arduino-powered buggy. We used IR with a TV remote to issue codes for motor control and combinations of colours for the RGB LEDs.

Programming was fairly simple, but we found issues with power. It seems that motors are very noisy and when they run it can reset the Arduino. We solved this by running the motor off 4 x AA batteries, whilst the Arduino is powered by a phone battery booster. The Arduino in question is actually a Freetronics Leostick, which is a nice small board, and has a USB plug which we just plugged straight into the phone battery.

New Raspberry Pi 3 setup

This is the second Raspberry Pi I’ve bought, this one is for school projects. The really neat feature is that it has built-in WiFi.

  1. Download NOOBS and copy onto a MicroSD card
  2. Put in the MicroSD card and boot the RPi, then run the installer
  3. After a while, it restarts and you get the desktop. At this point it was easy just to join the home network and we’re done to this point
  4. At school, we set up a fixed IP address on a hidden wireless network, and used the MAC address to secure access to the network
  5. Proxy settings needed to be added
  6. Now, to run some updates. First apt-get update, then apt-upgrade
  7. Install vncserver so we can connect remotely using Chicken of the VNC

Now it’s time to tackle some specific jobs we need for projects.

  1. I used this article IoT: Raspberry Pi Robot with Video Streamer and Pan/Tilt camera remote control over internet to install lighttpd so now we have a simple web server running on the Pi . I wrote a simple page in Nano to test that it works

Raspberry Pi!

So it’s been busy, and school is just about to go back. I did find time to try out my Christmas present so I opened up the kit, plugged in the SD card and WiPi adaptor, hooked up peripherals that normally are hooked up to the Mac Mini, plugged in the power and we’re up and running. A few clicks and we’ve joined the network and posting a new item on this blog!

Arduino + shield

Shield with RF module added
Shield with RF module added

So this project had been sitting on my desk for ages now with the sensors and RF module spread across two breadboards with a mess of wire connecting it all up. Today I finally found some time to add the RF module to a prototyping shield. The other sensors are still on a breadboard and that’s the extra wires hanging off it, but it’s one step closer to a finished project. Some of the soldering was a bit fiddly but worked straight off.

Weather station installation

Sensor array installed on the roof at last.
Sensor array installed on the roof at last.

Home early from work and a beautiful afternoon, so I thought, it’s time to install the weather station sensor array on the roof. There is a pipe from a flue or something up there that is doing nothing and ideal. Didn’t take too long, used the compass on the phone and checked the satellite image on Google Maps to get a good idea of where North is. Even whilst I was up there I could see that it was picking up much more wind rather than when it had been down low and sheltered.

There’s a whole heap of updates still to write, but this is now sending data to my Arduino which is getting pushed to the internet along with some data from sensors inside the house.

Stay tuned.

Code time again

Useful links:

These articles together form the source that I drew inspiration from. I didn’t have to do my own signal timing analysis which sounds fascinating but complicated. The above code examples however are written either for Raspberry Pi, or for Arduino using different models of Fine Offset sensors and transmitters.

Receiving sensor data

The next step was to figure out how to receive the sensor data being transmitted to the display base station. There’s plenty of articles on the web describing parts of the puzzle, but I didn’t find any one article that explained it all. For testing I used a Freetronics LeoStick and a 433MHz RF receiver module set up on a breadboard, so I could leave the original sketch still running on my desktop feeding data to the web. The LeoStick was particularly easy to use as I could just plug it into a USB port and test code from anywhere in the house without being tethered to power.